The Fatima epoch: has it finished? (Part IV)

1929 – by interesting coincidence that year was named in Soviet historiography “a year of Great Break”, because in 1929 the Soviet government finally renounced the previous (less radical and more liberal) economic policy and accelerated collectivization of agriculture directed against the Russian peasantry. The reaction to this policy was the wave of peasants’ revolts in many regions of the USSR during 1929–1931.

Continue reading “The Fatima epoch: has it finished? (Part IV)”

The Fatima epoch: has it finished? (Part III)

August 19, 1927 – Soviet press (official Izvestia newspaper) made public a Declaration of Sergius Stragorodsky, Acting Patriarchal Locum Tenens of the Orthodox church in Russia, about the “unconditional loyalty of the Orthodox Church to the Soviet state”. Although this important document was signed before, it was made public exactly on the “Fatima day” of August 19. Unfortunately, this event is not widely known outside Russia, including in religious circles, although it is directly linked with religion.[1] This document laid the foundation of such phenomenon (which the Orthodox opposing him called heresy) as Сергианство (Sergianism).

Continue reading “The Fatima epoch: has it finished? (Part III)”

The Fatima epoch: has it finished? (Part II)

June 13, 1918 – near the Russian city of Perm, Bolsheviks murdered the first member of the Russian Imperial family, who was none other than the Grand Duke Michael, in whose favor Emperor Nicholas II abdicated the throne in the spring of 1917. Though Michael did not accept the throne, he was, according to some historians and jurists, factually the last possessor of the Russian throne. Thus the Romanov dynasty began with Michael and ended with Michael. In some sense, we can consider this as a symbolic end of the Old Russia. The Grand Duke’s remains are still not found.